On Optimisation of Environmentally Friendly Aircraft Engine Cycles

Authors

  • Cesar Celis Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-900, Brazil
  • Vishal Sethi School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom
  • Riti Singh School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom
  • Pericles Pilidis School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom

Keywords:

Engine cycle optimisation, Aircraft emissions, Environmental impact

Abstract

In this work the Techno-economic Environmental Risk Analysis framework, a multi-disciplinary optimisation tool developed by Cranfield University, is utilised in conjunction with an in-house optimiser to carry out aircraft engine cycle optimisation processes. The central point here is the evaluation of the capabilities of the in-house optimiser for performing this type of optimisation processes. Simplifying hypotheses are thus considered when both defining the aircraft flight trajectory and modelling the different engine configurations analysed. Accordingly, several optimum engine cycles minimising separately three objective functions, (i) specific fuel consumption in cruise, (ii) fuel burned, and (iii) oxides of nitrogen emitted, are determined. The cycle optimisation processes carried out yield results reflecting the general trends expected when optimising according to these objective functions. It follows then that the in-house optimiser is suitable for carrying out gas turbine power plant optimisation processes. It is expected that this optimiser is utilised in future for both optimising the preliminary design of gas turbine engines, and determining optimum and ‘greener’ aircraft engine cycles.

Author Biographies

Cesar Celis, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-900, Brazil

Dr. Celis got a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering from National University of Engineering, Peru, in 2002. During 2004-2006 he attended the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio (Brazil), getting a MSc degree in Mechanical Engineering. In 2006/2007, he worked as a Research Engineer at the Institute of Energy of PUC-Rio performing gas turbines industry-relevant research. As a Doctoral Researcher at Cranfield University, from where he got his PhD degree, he focused his research on advanced aircraft propulsion systems. He currently works as Research Project Coordinator at PUC-Rio and his main research fields relate to Turbulent Combustion modelling.

Vishal Sethi, School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom

Dr. Sethi is a Research Fellow in the Department of Power and Propulsion at Cranfield University, where he completed a PhD degree in 2008. His PhD project was part of the EU FP6 Collaborative Project “VIVACE” where his main contributions were towards the development of the PROOSIS gas turbine simulation software. Dr. Sethi leads the research and development activities of the Techno-Economic Environmental Risk Assessment (TERA) framework for civil aviation. Dr. Sethi’s current research activities also include investigating the potential of disruptive propulsion technologies and alternative fuels for civil aviation. In addition, Dr. Sethi lecturers in Gas Turbine Fluid Thermodynamics.

Riti Singh, School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom

Riti Singh is an Emeritus Professor of Cranfield University. Professor Singh has chaired many international conferences on gas turbine technology where he has frequently been the plenary/keynote speaker. He is a Board member (and Past Chair) of the Aerospace Industries Board, Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the International Society of Air Breathing Engines (ISABE) where he was previously Vice-President. Earlier he was a Director of the European Turbine Network. He has an interest in novel cycles for power and propulsion. He has over 40 years' experience in gas turbine research, design and development. He has held senior appointments within industry.

Pericles Pilidis, School of Engineering, Cranfield University Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom

Professor Pilidis completed a doctorate in Gas Turbine Engineering at Glasgow University. His first employment was with the British Caledonian group in the gas turbine overhaul business. Professor Pilidis joined Cranfield University in 1986 and is now the Head of the Power and Propulsion Department. Over the years he has applied performance modelling techniques to issues of relevance to operation, maintenance and control. He has organised and contributed to international teaching and applied research programmes in the gas, oil and aviation industries. He has acted as a consultant to several organisations and his contributions have resulted in many international honours.

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Published

2015-05-30

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Section

Original Papers